Nightbooks by J.A. White

Nightbooks by J.A. White
October 5, 2019 Alexandra Adlawan

HAPPY OCTOBER!

Let’s starts this marathon of horror with a creepy, spine-tingling thriller!

6th Grade and Up

Alex has loved scary stories his whole life.

He never imagined he’d be trapped in one.

When Alex sneaks out in the middle of the night, he becomes imprisoned by the witch Natacha in her magical apartment. Another child in the apartment, Yasmin, assures Alex that she’s already tried every means of escape. Only Natacha holds the bonekeys that lead back to their world, and she’ll never part from them.

But Natacha likes stories. And Alex’s only chance for survival is to keep Natacha satisfied by reading her one of his own hair-raising tales each night. But Alex is running out of time—and original stories—and he’s desperate for a way out of this twisted place.

Alex has loved scary stories his whole life.

He knows most don’t have a happy ending…

 

A modern spin on the Scheherazade story with haunting twist. For those of you don’t know the story of Scheherazade, here’s a short summary:

A king, who ruled over a Persian Empire, found out that his first wife was unfaithful to him. He then started marrying a new woman each day as well as beheading the previous day’s wife, so that she wouldn’t have a chance to be unfaithful. Scheherazade, daughter of the vizier (fancy word for political advisor), volunteered to spend one night with the king. To stay alive, Scheherazade told the king a different story each night and stopped in the middle, so he had to keep her around to find out how it ends. After 1,001 nights and 1,000 stories, the king had fallen in love with Scheherazade. He spared her life and made her his queen. The end.

There’s a shorter summary of this story in the book but I wanted to give you a more detailed version. And if the name Scheherazade seems familiar to you, it might be because it appears in Disney’s Aladdinin the classic song Friend Like Me. See below:

Well Ali Baba had them forty thieves

Scheherazad-ie had a thousand tales

 

This book is just dark enough. The thought of being captured and kept prisoner by a witch will have you jumping for light switches and hiding under your bed covers. I love a good horror story as much as the next person (whatever that means), as long as there isn’t too much blood and over-the-top violence. That’s why I like my horror stories in written form. I wish I was brave enough to watch horror movies in the theater because I’ve always wanted to be that person who shouts at the screen, yelling things like “Don’t go in there!” and “Don’t put your hand in that!” and “That guy is chasing you with a knife! Why are you running upthe stairs?!”

 

I hated how Alex kept saying he wanted to be normal because his classmates teased him for liking scary and dark things. Normal people seldom make history. I can understand why some adults would be concerned about a child writing scary stories but as long as those dark thoughts stay on paper I think the kid will be okay.

 

Not only is this an ideal book for readers of scary stories, it’s great for budding new writers since this story is about creating stories. For those of you who plan on reading this book but aren’t familiar in the art of story writing, let me give you a little insight. As a blog writer, artist and published author of a children’s picture book, I know quite a bit about this subject. For one thing, you can’t force brilliance. It doesn’t matter if you are surrounded by distractions or sitting in silence, sometimes nothing comes to you. I get writers block all the time, you wouldn’t believe how much writer’s block I had writing this review. The best way to get past it is either try to work on something else or taking a break from writing all together.

 

This weeks’ Weird but True Fact about Famous Horror-film Director Alfred Hitchcock

Alfred Hitchcock was afraid of eggs.

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